#01087
Sons Of Labrador (Innugiamik Labradorimi) video
#1666: YouTube video by nikamuna09
©2010 ~ Used with permission ~

midi   alt: midi file

To be a part of this great land
should be the pride of any man,
To know that we were born on this great shore;
So listen while I tell and it makes my old heart swell,
I'm proud to be a son of Labrador.

It's rugged mountains rise above the ocean,
Where polar bears and seals are to be found;
It's sparkling rivers flow through mountain valleys,
Where the caribou and wolf and fox abound.

I love to hear the call
of the geese in the early fall,
And see the black bear roaming by the shore,
And hunt the Arctic deer or fish the Arctic char;
There's no place on this earth like Labrador.

It's rugged mountains rise above the ocean,
Where polar bears and seals are to be found;
It's sparkling rivers flow through mountain valleys,
Where the caribou, and wolf and fox abound.

There's not much more to say
but I know we are here to stay,
To live and hunt and trap on this great land;
But most of all to me is to have the liberty,
To be a son of Northern Labrador.

It's rugged mountains rise above the ocean,
Where polar bears and seals are to be found;
It's sparkling rivers flow through mountain valleys,
Where the caribou, and wolf and fox abound.

####.... Sid Dicker of Nain, Labrador ....####
Recorded by The Flummies (Labradorimiut / The Flummies, trk#1, 2000, World Replication Group, Toronto, Ontario, produced by the Flummies and Sim Savory and recorded at Sim's Studio in Belleoram, NL).

See more songs by The Flummies.

Note: Labradorimiut is a Labrador Inuit word meaning 'from Labrador'.

The video above features a live performance by the Gregoire Boys with the Nain Drum Dancers during Innu Nikamu at Mani-utenam, Quebec on August 6, 2010.

From The Canadian Encyclopedia:
Innu Nikamu - annual festival of traditional and contemporary Amerindian music, featuring hunters and musicians from Quebec. The name translates either as 'the Indian sings' or 'song in Indian'. Inaugurated in 1985, the four-day event takes place near Sept-Îles, Quebec, and draws together upwards of 6000 attendees from the 11 different First Nations in Quebec, from other Native communities in Labrador, Ontario, the Maritimes, and the West, and a small number of non-Native visitors. Organizers emphasize the power of music as a means of survival, both a vehicle for creative expression in native languages, and a facilitator of inter-community exchange, celebration, and the expression of solidarity. Traditional hunting songs, traditional songs from the inter-tribal powwow repertoire, contemporary 'folk-Innu', various genres and styles of popular music, native theatre, show performances of traditional dance, and Inuit vocal games have been featured at the festival.



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