My Genealogy Page On "Crowe"

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Our Clan Ross

Septs of Clan Ross Anderson, Andison, Andrew/s, Corbett, Crow/e, Croy, Deas, Denoon, Denune, Dingwall, Duthie, Fair, Fear/n, Gair, Gear, Gillanders, Hagart, Haggart, MacAndrew/s, MacCullie, MacCulloch, MacLulich, MacLulloch, MacNab, MacTaggart, McTaggart, MacTear, MacTier, MacTire, MacTyre, Mitchell, Taggart, Tarrel, Tullo, Tulloch, Tyre, Vass, Wass, Waters, McEntagert (Ireland), McEnteggart (Ireland), McEntaggert (Ireland)

"Sept" is a term borrowed from Irish culture in the nineteenth century to explain the use of a variety of surnames by member of a single clan. In Ireland, "sept" is roughly synonymous with the Scottish "clan" and refers to an intra-related family. Where Scots would refer to "MacGregor and his clan" an Irish historian might say "O'Neill and his sept". The Irish historically have princes and think in terms of land rather than names. Thus, the name "O'Brien" might be a sept of several different princes. In Scotland, only in the case of larger clans with distinct and sometimes widely separated sub-families is the term "sept" appropriate. The various branches of Clan Donald, for example, all using the name "MacDonald of ..." or "MacDonell of ..." may properly be viewed as septs. The many other names of Clan Donald are just that -- names of Clan Donald.

The variety of surnames within a Scottish clan do not represent separate and definable sub-clans but instead reflect the vagaries of transition of the Gaels into the English naming system as well as marriages, migrations and occupations. The main family itself may have developed a variety of surnames. In the Glen Urquhart parish record, one man is variously identified as "John Miller" (referring to his occupation), "John Ban" (referring to his hair colour) and "John Ban Miller". In Gaelic he was called Iain Mac Aillein, "John, Son of Allan". When his name was "made official", he could have been named either 'John Miller", "John Bain", or "John MacAllan." Actually, he was "John Grant".

The preferred modern usage is to avoid the use of the term "sept" and to simply describe these names as what they are -- surnames of the family and of allied or dependent families. It is preferable to speak of "The names and families of Clan X" rather than to call a name "a sept of Clan X".

From "Tartan For Me! 7th Edition. Heritage Books, 1540-E Pointer Ridge Place, Bowie MD 20716

Is your name spelled a little differently? Many people ask: "My family's surname is close to one of the Ross names, but not quite the same. Does that mean Ross is my clan, or not?"

Clan Ross genealogist, Fran Bumann FSA Scot says: "There are lots of variations in spelling of all of our names. One must remember that a large percentage of our ancestors were illiterate. (And, sometimes I suspect the county clerks and the census takers were somewhat illiterate too.)

"The first rule of genealogy is: 'Spelling doesn't count!' If a person has a name that looks like one of ours and he or she wants to be a Ross, great.

"If they have a family legend that they're Rosses, or that they're Scottish, it works for me," Fran says. "We'll use this approach until they decide to require DNA testing to prove our heritage!"

Clan Ross has two families of Rosses, one spelled Russ and the other spelled Rose. Both knew themselves to be Ross long ago, but the spellings changed over the years. The same goes for our "sept" or associated family names. An extra letter here or there? An a for an e? No matter.

Occasionally a family chose a new spelling on purpose, but names were usually changed accidentally, through misunderstanding of foreign languages, interpretation of handwriting, what sounded like something else, spelling irregularities, Anglicized versions -- things like that.

Think about how often your own surname has been misspelled.

James Crowe


James Crowe and his numerous family left Ireland on the ship Hopewell', arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia October 9th 1761. They lived at Windsor, NS for a time, finally settling in communities in present day Colchester County. The descendants of this man number over 10,000 & would love to hear form more of you !!

Born: ABOUT 1715 / Ulster Scot Died: in Portaupique, Col, NS, Can.

Family 1:

*MARGARET CROWE, b. 1736 in Ireland* JOSEPH CROWE, b. 1738 in Ireland* JAMES CROWE, b. ABOUT 1740 in Ireland* AARON CROWE, b. 1743 in Ireland* THOMAS CROWE, b. 1746 in Ireland* JOHN CROWE, b. 1749 in Ireland * NICHOLAS CROWE, b. ABOUT 1750 in Ireland **I am descended from Nicholas Crowe**

My Family Tree

/--NICHOLAS CROWE b. ABOUT 1750 d. 1801 =>* /--JAMES W. CROWE b. ABOUT 1776 d. 1 MAY 1850* | \--JANE HARRISON b. ABOUT 1760 d. bef ORE 1801* /--PATRICK H. CROWE b. 1821* | | /--JAMES FULTON b. 1739 d. 25 SEP 1826 =>* | \--MARY FULTON b. 8 AUG 1780 d. 9 JAN 1857* | \--MARGARET CAMPBELL b. 1754 d. 12 AUG 1833 =>* /--SELDON CROWE b. ABOUT 1861* | \--JANE LEWIS b. ABOUT 1823* /--RAYMOND SELDON CROWE b. 6 MAR 1884 d. 1933* | | /--RAYMOND DeMAYER* | \--ELIZABETH DeMAYER | \--EVA SCHIEDEL b. 1836 JEANNETTE ADALAIDE CROWE \--VENDELL HELEN MEYERS b. 2 JUL 1888 d. 23 JAN 1938/---Jeannette Adalaid Crowe b. 24 Jun 1920/ Raymond Seldon Crowe b. 1914/---

JEANNETTE ADALAIDE CROWE B. 1920 Father: RAYMOND SELDON CROWE, b. 6 MAR 1884 in Roxbury, MA, USA Mother: VENDELL HELEN MEYERS, b. 2 JUL 1888

Jeannette A. Crowe, Aug. 6, 1938 married, FRANK HOEFFER, b. 1914 in Cincinnati, OH, USA, Frank Hoeffer d. Jan. 1985

Children: VALERIE HOEFFER , FRANK HOEFFER, PAMELA HOEFFER-Walton (Me)



Reference books say that Crowe has many spelling variations. From time to time the surname was spelt McEnchroe, MacEnroe, McEnroe, Crowe, Crow, McEnchro, McInroe, McInchroe, McEncroe, McInro, McEnro, and these different spellings frequently occurred, even between father and son. Preferences for the spelling variations usually arose from a division of the family, or for religious reasons, or sometimes for patriotic reasons. Church officials and scribes spelt the name as it sounded, sometimes several different ways in the lifetime of the same person."

From a reference book: "The very English-looking name Crowe disguises the genuinely Irish surname MacEnchroe, which in its original Gaelic form is Mac Conchradha. Woulfe states that the form MacEnchroe is still in use; but all the members of this sept who live in its original territory, viz. Thomond, are certainly called simply Crowe.

The sept was subordinate to that of O'Dea and was located in the western part of the present barony of Inchiquin. The great majority of Crowes either hail from Clare and Tipperary or are of families which migrated to Dublin and other large urban centres from that area. The name is fairly numerous in Belfast but most of these are presumably of British planted stock, Crowe being quite a common name in England.

The old form MacEnchroe was that usually used in the transplantation certificates of the 1650's. In one or two cases the form MacCrowe was used. It is preserved in the motto "Skeagh mac en chroe" attached to the coat of arms of the Clare Crowes (see Plate X). It is interesting to note that there is a place-name near Mount Callan in Co.. Clare called Skaghvicencrowe which means the thorn bush of MacEncroe.

Some branches of the Crowe sept used a thorn bush as the main charge in their arms. The old form was still used in Co. Tipperary in the last century, eg. by the family of Rev. John McEnroe (1795-1868), who, as well as being the founder of the Freeman's Journal of Sydney, is noteworthy for his edition of Donlevy's Catechism. Dermot MacEncroe (fl. 1730), author of many beautiful poems in Latin, was of a French family which had emigrated from Co. Clare and used de la Croix as a French form of MacEncroe.

During the early years of the 1760's many Ulster Scots, from the northern provinces of Ireland arrived in Nova Scotia to take up grants of land offered by the Government. The desire of the government was to settle the province with English speaking Protestants, upon lands previously occupied by the French Acadians who had been removed from the province a few years before.

James and his family were among the many families living in Ireland who responded to the plans of Land Agent, Alexander McNutt, which began with an advertisement placed in the "BELFAST NEWSLETTER" on April 20, 1761. In this advertisement McNutt declared he had come to Ireland to procure settlers and to invite his fellow countrymen to "a grand outlet and relief for all such industrious farmers and usefull mechanics as may find themselves in difficulties in the mother country". This declaration convinced many families to leave homes, parents and children, for the promise of land & opportunities they could never hope to have in Ireland.

McNutt chartered two vessels, the "JUPITER" and the "HOPEWELL", to transport the families that wished to go to Nova Scotia. A few weeks following the initial advertisement, he placed another "urging haste and reccommending that, if a family could not go immediately, then it should send one of its number to take possession forthwith and prepare for the ultimate arrival of the remainder of the family". Upon the arrival of these ships at Halifax, Nova Scotia a committee was chosen from among the passengers to view the area that was to become their home and the following advertisement appeared in the "BELFAST NEWSLETTER" on March 11th 1762 giving an account of what the settlers had found upon their arrival.

"Nova Scotia, Halifax, November 16, 1761. These may certify, that we the subscribers, being chosen a committee by the people arrived in this province, from the kingdom of Ireland, the last summer, have at their request journeyed to the bason of Minis and Cobuquet, and diligently viewed the land situated on those bays, which were reserved for Col. Mc.Nutt, and his associates; and are of opinion, that the said lands are equal in goodness, and fully answer the description given by him in an advertisement, published by him at Londonderry, bearing date the 20th day of April, 1761. And do further certify, that in our opinion the said lands and soil is equal in goodness to the best lands in Ireland, and capable of producing wheat, rye, barley, oats, pease, hemp, flax, potatoes, turnips, and all sorts of garden stuff, which grow here with the greatest luxurience; and (as some of us have been in the province of Pensylvania) that the soil of this country is much richer, and bears every thing larger and in greater abundance than that of Pensylvania; and that all the lands so reserved for Col. Mc.Nutt, are situated on bays and navigable rivers, so that every farmer may have vessels come close to his dwelling, for the selling, and transporting his produce; whereas those to be granted in Pensylvania, are more than two hundred miles within land, and that carring the produce to market there costs as much as the several species of grain are worth at market. And we take this opportunity to assure all our countymen, that our reception here exceeded far what Col. Mc.Nutt had assured us of; and that we found all the inhabitants ready to assist, and promote us in our undertaking, with all good offices, and treated us with the goodness and humanity.

(signed)

Andrew Ross, Parish Belroshain, County Antrim. William Moore, Parish of Faun, County Donegal. William Henderson, Ruthmillon, County Donegal. William McNutt, Parish Mavash, County Donegal. John Mahon, Russes, County Donegal. Joseph Crawford, near Rathmalton, County Donegal. Robert Spencer, Cland Horky, County Donegal. John Morrison, Parish Ry Tollebebebly, County Donegal. Benjamin Mc.Nutt, Parish Mavagh, Bar. Killnacrenen, C. Donegal. Mark Patton, Parish Forghan Vael, County Donegal. John McNutt, Tullyachnish, County Donegal. Daniel Cochron, Derrykrychen, County Donegal. Robert Smith, of Cahery, Parish of Drummscose, County Donegal. Anthony Mc.Clean, near Letter Kenny, County Donegal. John Clark, Parish Tamlaughtsmleggan, County Derry. John Barnhill, Parish Lake, County Donegal.

Halifax, Nov. 17 1761 - The above signers personally appeared before me, one of his Majesty's council for said province, and subscribed their names to the truth of the above declaration. CHARLES MORRIS

Three months after the appearance of the above advertisement in Ireland, McNutt again arrived in Ireland promoting the opportunites awaiting in Nova Scotia and published notice that "as his stay will be short, any persons who incline to proceed with him to Nova Scotia must be speedy in their application, as the season is far advanced". Chartered vessels, the "NANCY" and the "HOPEWELL" left Ireland in late August transporting McNutt, along with those joining families who had made the voyage the previous year and any others wishing to settle in Nova Scotia. They arrived at Halifax in November of 1762.

Many of the names mentioned in the committee above, became neighbors of the Crowe family in the Cobequid Townships in the years to come. In particular, the John Barnhill found on the list above, was to become a brother-in-law and father-in-law in this Crowe family. It is not known for certain if the Crowe family came with this first group of settlers from Ireland, or exactly what year they did arrive. It is know however, that the family first settled at Windsor, Hants County. The only daughter we have record of, Margaret, married there in 1772. All but one of the six sons known to belong to this family, married and eventually settled in the Cobequid Townships, now included in present day Colchester County. James himself lived his senior years at Portaupique, Londonderry Township, where his son Nicholas had settled.

The name of his wife has not been located on any family papers or provincial documents as yet. It has been suggested her name may have been Sarah and that she did come to Nova Scotia, but died soon after - no documentation on this, just something that has been believed in the family. The name Sarah certainly had some importance in the family, as each of his married children gave the name to a daughter in their family and in all cases but one, it was to the eldest daughter. The first of this Crowe family to settle within the Cobequid area was Joseph, who had received a grant of land in the Londonderry Township by 1765. The rest of the family appear to have stayed in Windsor, Hants County, until after the year 1774 as none of their names appear on any of the earliest census records of the area. Deeds record that on June 25th 1773, Thomas, Aaron & John were residents of "Windsor, in the Province of Nova Scotia", and that by Sep 26th 1779, Thomas was a resident of "Londonderry in the province of Nova Scotia" and Aaron & John were "both of Onslow in said province". When Nicholas settled at Portaupique is not known for certain, but it was likely near the same time his brothers were making their moves to Cobequid.

No record of the death of James Sr. or his burial place has been located. It is assumed he died at the home of his son Nicholas at Portaupique, sometime after the year 1774



James Crowe, with his six sons and one daughter, emigrated from Londonderry, in the North of Ireland, to Nova Scotia in the ship "Hopewell." We cannot ascertain whether his wife came to this country or not. He, with four of his sons and one daughter, settled first at Windsor. His daughter's name was Margaret. She was married there to Daniel Frizzell, and had two daughters. One of these daughters was married to Mr. Snide, who removed and settled on the West side of Shubenacadie River, nearly opposite Fort Ellis, where they died. Joseph, the eldest son of this James Crowe, was born in Ireland in the year 1738.

He was married to Esther Barnhill, about the year 1759. Margaret, their eldest daughter, was born in Ireland in the year 1760. She was married to Joseph Mahon, of Londonderry. They had three sons and four daughters. Esther, the second daughter of Joseph and Esther Crowe, was born in Chiganois in the year 1762. She was married to John, son of James Fulton, Esq., and Margaret Campbell, of Bass River. They had six sons and six daughters. James, the eldest son of Joseph Crowe, Senr., and Esther Barnhill, was born in Chiganois in the year 1764.

He was married to Letitia, daughter of Jasper McKinlay and Letitia Green, in the year 1785. They had four sons and six daughters. He settled on the same place that was afterwards inherited by his four sons, and had his house near the place which his son Jasper now resides. He built mills at the same place that his son James now has mills. They reared their family and died at this place.

Mr. Crowe died in the month of October, 1823, aged 59 years, and his wife, Letitia, died in the month of January, 1844, aged 78 years. Esther, their eldest daughter, was born in the year 1786. She was married to David, the third son of Nicholas Crowe, of Bass River. They settled on the Folly Mountain and had three sons and three daughters. Letitia, the second daughter of James and Letitia Crowe, was born May 29th, 1790. She was married to Thomas, youngest son of Thomas Crowe and Sarah Barnhill, of Beaver Brook, Clifton, October 11th, 1814. They had five sons and two daughters.

They appear among the descendants of Thomas Crowe, Senr. Joseph, the eldest son of James and Letitia Crow, was born January 1st, 1792. He was married to Jane, daughter of John Staples and Catherine Blair, December 28th, 1828. He inherited a part of his father's farm, and half of the Mills. He built the house that is still standing on the north side of the Mill Pond, where they reared their family and spent the remainder of their lives.

He died January 3rd, 1868, aged 76 years, and his wife died April 29th, 1853. They had six sons and six daughters. Sarah, the third daughter of James and Letitia Crow, was born in 1794. She was married to Ezra Stevens, of Onslow Mountain, March 8th, 1825. They had two sons and four daughters. Jasper their second son was born December 25th, 1796. He was married to Jane, the third daughter of John and Elizabeth Deyarmond, February 15th, 1825. He inherited the homestead part of his father's property. They had two sons and four daughters. Mr. Jasper Crowe has filled the office of Elder in the Presbyterian Congregation of Onslow, and Superintendent of Sabbath schools since about the year 1835.

Margaret, the fourth daughter of James and Letitia Crowe, was born April 5th, 1799. She was married to John Carter, of Lower Onslow, March 12th, 1824. They had four sons and four daughters. She died April fifth, 1852. Her husband died in December, 1870. James, the third son of James and Letitia Crowe, was born February, 1802. He was married to Mary, daughter of Thomas and Esther Wilson of Shubenacadie, March 9th, 1839. They have two sons and one daughter. He inherited a part of his father's property, and is now owner of the Mills. Rebecca, the fifth and youngest daughter of James and Letitia Crowe, was born August, 1803. She was married to James Crowe, Esq. They had one son and four daughters. Samuel, the fourth and youngest son of James and Letitia Crow, was born June 20th, 1805. He was married to Sarah, the eldest daughter of Joseph and Mary Crow, November 30th, 1829.

They had three sons and one daughter. He inherited a part of his father's property, where he spent the remainder of his days. He died July 19th, 1871, aged 66 years. Sarah, the third daughter of Joseph Crowe, Senr., and Esther Barnhill, was born in the year 1766. She was married to John Barnhill, of Chiganois, about the year 1786. They had four sons and two daughters. These appear among the Barnhill families. She died June 30th, 1825, aged 59 years, and her husband died October 23rd, 1847, aged 85 years. Rebecca, the fourth and youngest daughter of Joseph and Esther Crowe, was born in the year 1769. She was married to Alexander Miller of Truro, December 6th, 1792. She died October 19th, 1793, aged 24 years. Joseph, the second son of Joseph Crowe, Senr., and Esther Barnhill, was born in the year 1771.

He was married to Mary, daughter of David Vance and Jane Hill, in the year 1794. He inherited his father's property in Chiganois Village, where they reared their family. He died December 28th, 1855, aged 84 years, and his wife died January 3rd, 1832, aged 60 years. David Vance Crowe, their eldest son, was born July 9th, 1795. He was married to Esther, second daughter of Alexander and Alice Barnhill, of Truro, January 1817. They settled at Debert River, where he reclaimed his farm from the forest. He was appointed Justice of the Peace when a young man, and he filled the office of Custodes Rotulorum, for the County of Colchester for a number of years before he died. They had four sons and three daughters. He died June 14th, 1868, aged 73 years, and his widow died October 22nd, 1872, aged 74 years.

Joseph, the second son of Joseph and Mary Crowe, was born in 1799. He was married to Margaret, daughter of Charles Hill, of Economy, February, 1831. They had two sons and one daughter. He carried on business as a Merchant at the Folly for a number of years, and his first wife died there October 15th 1841, aged 32 years. He then removed to Truro, built the store that George Gunn now occupies, where he carried on business until the time of his death. His second wife was Maria Dimock, widow of the late Arnold Shaw of Newport. He purchased the house in which his son Leander J. Crow now resides, where he spent the remainder of his days. He died October 17th, 1860, aged 61 years. Charles, the third son of Joseph and Mary Crowe, was born March 8th, 1801. He inherits a part of his father's farm, where he is living a bachelor.

James Crowe, Esq., their fourth son, was born June, 1803. He was married to Rebecca, the youngest daughter of James and Letitia Crow, March, 1828. They had one son and four daughters. Sarah, the eldest daughter of Joseph and Mary Crow, was born August 15th, 1805. She was married to Samuel Crow, January 8th, 1828. They had three sons and one daughter. Rebecca, their second daughter, was born in 1808. She was married to George Cook, of Truro, February 17th, 1828. They had one son and four daughters. Jane, the third daughter of Joseph and Mary Crow, was born August, 1810. She was married to George Yuill, of Clifton, July 9th, 1839. They had one son and one daughter. Mary Ann, their fourth daughter, was born December 27th, 1812. She was married to Francis Layton, Esq., of Truro, February 23rd, 1837. They had two sons and three daughters. Mr. Layton died November 21st, 1871.

Thomas, the fifth and youngest son of Joseph and Mary Crowe, was born January 1st, 1817. He was married to Sarah, daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Barnhill, January 14th, 1844. They have four sons and three daughters. He inherits a part of his father's farm in Chiganois Village. Thomas, the third and youngest son of Joseph Crowe, Senr., and Esther Barnhill, was born in Chiganois in the year 1773. He was married to Esther, daughter of James Fulton, Esq., and Margaret Campbell, of Bass River, in the year 1796. He was the first who settled at Debert River. His house stood on the west side of the road, opposite James McCulloch's store. He reclaimed his farm from the forest, and continued to live there until several of his sons became men, and he divided his farm between several of them, and removed to Bass River, where he settled for the remainder of his life. He died there in the month of November, 1854, aged 81 years, and his wife died October, 1867, aged 88 years.

They had eight sons and six daughters. Rebecca, their oldest daughter, was born 1797. She was married to John the eldest son of Captain Thomes Fletcher and Elizabeth Barnhill, February 27th, 1820. They had three sons and four daughters. James, the eldest son of Thomas and Esther Crow, was born March 31st, 1799. He was married to Jane, daughter of William Fletcher and Agnes Davison, his wife of Portaupique, February, 1823. They had four sons and four daughters. Mrs. Crow died May 15th, 1849. Joseph, their second son, was born January, 1801. He was married to Rossann, daughter of the Rev. John Brown, November 2nd, 1823. They had three sons and three daughters. They inherited the homestead part of his father's farm at Debert River. He died March, 1870, and his wife died May 15th, 1856.

John, their third son, was born February 9th, 1802. He was married to Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Magdalen Baird, March, 1827. They had one son and two daughters. Mrs. Crow died February 16th, 1845. He was married again to Susan, daughter of David Blackemore and Janet Hoar, of North River, March 3rd, 1846. They had three sons and four daughters. William, the fourth son of Thomas and Esther Crowe, was born September, 1803. He was married to Isabell Fulton, of Bass River, 1825. They had four sons and four daughters. Margaret, the second daughter of Thomas and Esther Crow, was born September, 1804. She was married to Thomas Fulton, of Bass River, in 1829. They had four sons and two daughters. Dr. Robert F. Crow, their fourth son, was born 1805. He was married to Rebecca, fourth daughter of Mark P. and Margaret Martin, 1830. They had one daughter, (who is now the wife of Thomas McCulloch, of Halifax.) He died October, 1844, and his wife died July 6th, 1843, aged 33 years.

Sarah, their third daughter, was married to Archibald Davison. They had five sons and four daughters. He was chopping in the woods, and a tree fell on his leg, and smashed it so badly that it had to be taken off. This took place about the year 1840. He is still living. Esther, the fourth daughter of Esther and Thomas Crow, was married to William Davison. They had five sons and four daughters, George, their sixth son was married to Jane Fulton. They had three sons and three daughters.

Thomas, their seventh son , was married to Lucy Davison. They had one son. David, their eighth and youngest son , was married to Sarah McCully. They had three sons and four daughters. Hannah Jane, their fifth daughter, was married to George Creelman. She died and left no family. Rachel Ann, their sixth and youngest daughter, was born July 12, 1826. She was married to John F. Crow, of Economy, January 15th, 1845. They had three sons and four daughters. They moved to Halifax, and she died there May 1st, 1863. James, the second son of James Crowe, Senr., was born in Ireland about the year 1740. He came with his father and the rest of the family, to Nova Scotia in the year 1761. He would be about 21 years old at the time. He did not remain in Nova Scotia long; he went to Philadelphia and settled there. He carried on business and became wealthy. He married and died there without children.

Aaron, the third son of James Crowe, Senr., was born in Ireland in the year 1743, and came with his father and family to Nova Scotia when he was 18 years old. He went with his father to Windsor, and was married there to Abigail Murray, from Sutherlandshire, Scotland, April 15th, 1776. He removed to Onslow some time after the Township was granted. He purchased the farm on which his grandson, Daniel Hyslip now resides, where he settled, spent the remainder of his life, and died October 20th, 1818, aged 75 years, and his wife died September, 1825, aged 66 years.

Sarah, their oldest daughter, was born April 26th, 1777. She was married to William Murray. They had eight sons and one daughter. James, their eldest son, was born March 6th, 1779. He was drowned at Chester when he was about twenty-one years old. Daniel, their second son, was born March 3rd, 1781. He inherited his father's farm, where he lived and died a bachelor, June 9th, 1871, aged 89 years. Margaret their second daughter, was born December 28th, 1782. She was married to Rufus McNutt, of North River, July 26th 1802. They had ten sons and three daughters. She died in the month of April, 1869, aged 85 years. Abigail, the third daughter of Aaron and Abigail Crow, was born February 20th, 1785. She was married to Samuel Gray, of Pictou Co. They had two sons and four daughters. She died Nov., 1868. George, the third son of Aaron and Abigail Crowe, was born July 26th, 1787. He was married to Sarah, the eldest daughter of John and Jane Staples, of Chiganois, January 16th, 1816.

Mr. Crowe followed the sea when he was a young man. He removed to Tatamagouche Mountain, where he settled, cleared a farm, and spent the remainder of his life. They had four sons and four daughters. He died January 15th, 1857. Elizabeth, their fourth daughter, was born November 15th, 1797. She was married to Richard Hyslip (who had recently come out from Scotland), November, 1818. They had six sons and four daughters. Aaron, their fourth son, was born April 16th, 1790. He was married to Rachel, daughter of John and Jane Staples.... And this goes on and on...

crowe_photo.jpg

Crowe Mills 1872



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